Monday, August 8, 2011

No Borders

I'm one of those annoying people who hates change. I order the same meals whenever I go out to eat. I've had the same haircut for about four years. I can walk into my house and immediately spot if something is different. I'm so stubborn and OCD, I'd probably drive you mad.

I've really been trying lately not to live by a schedule, to just go with the flow, but I'm epically failing at it. But there have been so many changes in my life in the past few weeks, and there will be more in the weeks to come.

To embrace or not to embrace. That is the question.

I'm at that transition age in which I am supposed to get a job, move out of the house, all that good stuff, but in addition to the sociological stress that this period of my life places upon me, I have to deal with other people changing as well, and other things around me moving and shifting and appearing and disappearing.

My favorite store, Borders, is closing. First of all, for me, this means that there is only one book store in my town, and it has an awful selection. I can always buy books online, but I'm impatient when it comes to shipping. And secondly, I am terrified of what these means for the future of books.

The argument over paper books versus ebooks, it seems, has begun to come to a close. I am struggling with this immensely. I've always felt that holding a book in my hands is one of the biggest parts of appreciating the art of writing. Reading from a screen takes some of the artistic value of language out of it for me.

Plus it gives me headaches.

A technological society is something we must think about now (not like we haven't been thinking about it for at least the past century). We are on the eve of a new era. After watching all this Doctor Who lately, I am wary of what may happen to us, as individuals, as a culture, and as human beings.

To embrace or not to embrace. The force of this change has convinced me to embrace (though I won't be buying a Kindle any time soon). However, we must be cautious as we embrace the future. Do not lose sight of what humanity is all about. Do not let technology dehumanize people. In all those science fiction books and movies (and TV shows) dehumanization and corruption of power (as well as environmental issues, oh there are so many moving parts!) are evident. Let's not let our excitement get out of hand...

Without Borders, there are no borders! Anything can happen in the future, let's just make sure they are good things. :)

Peace, Aimee

5 comments:

  1. Perhaps embracing that change happens in a good way to go. Staying curious about what comes next keeps us from getting caught in the current of change. Ride the wave instead.

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  2. LONG LIVE THE PAPER BOOK. I'm a little fanatical about traditional books, though I can see the appeal of the e-books. I'm just one of those annoying people who thinks the power is going to go out one day and we're going to lose a lot of stuff. :(

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  3. I'm trying, Rebecca! :)

    L.G. - I think I'm going to be buying paper books as long they still exist. I'm totally not worried about the end of printing at all, but those people who decide to skip out on paper books and only publish ebooks are missing out on some appreciative readers!

    The only way I would buy an ereader is if my laptop, cell phone, and mp3 player all die at the same time, at which time I would probably buy an iphone.

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  4. i agree with you about being wary, definitely. i mean, the whole global warming stuff seriously freaks me out! buuut...at the same time, it's not as if we can do much about it, y'know? i mean sure, we can go green, but i agree with rebecca kiel. ride the wave, babe.

    okay, i know that sounds lame, but you know what i mean. :D

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